Dog Car Travel – 7 Essentials For Dog-Proofing Your Car

By DogDialog Team on 4 August 2017

You can tolerate the excited whines.

The wet nose nuzzling your ear isn’t a problem either.

No, the one thing that makes dog car travel so exasperating is the clean-up operation. Take a trip to the beach with your pooch and afterwards the interior of your car will look like it needs a hazmat team to restore to cleanliness.

 

Assuming you haven’t won the lottery, here are seven simple ways to help you and your car fight canine carnage.

 

1. A large waterproof blanket

You never appreciate quite how furry your furry friend is until you observe the state of your car’s interior after a trip with Fido. And while we are here, may we ask why dogs always have a good old shake at the end of their journey – just before they are let out of the car? Cover your rear seats with a large waterproof blanket to prevent the flurry of errant hairs (and other nasty accidents) embedding themselves in your upholstery. Lots of car companies even make custom fitted ones now to especially for dog car travel.

 

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Found on: www.wishforpets.com 

 

2. A steam cleaner

We heard those scoffs of derision when you read about the lint roller. It’s okay, we understand. Sometimes using a lint roller to clean up after doggy destruction is like using a toothpick to slice through a wheel of cheese. That’s why another key weapon in your arsenal should be a steam cleaner. Powerful, portable and particularly good for removing lingering odour caused by dog car travel.

 

3. AIR FRESHENER

If it rains during your trip with poochy – and remember this is the UK – we are assuming you don’t want that unmistakable wet dog smell lingering in your car – carry a sprayable air freshener to tackle the poochy pong.

 

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4. A lint roller

Stray hairs, meet sticky tape and lint rollers. A match made in heaven, and much more effective than a hoover (also useful for your clothes if you don’t want to arrive to your destination looking like a walking fur ball).

 

5. Cling film on the windows

Unless your pup is crated, it’s likely that during dog car travel, they will be pressing that wet nose up against your windows. Hot breath + wet nose + curious pooch = lots and lots of smears on your glass. Taping cling film to your windows pre-journey may look a bit weird, but it will do the job. Trust us.

 

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Found on www.polytheneuk.co.uk

 

6. Fabric waterproofing spray

Assuming you have utilised item 1 above, your rear seats will have a level of defence. But what about the rear-sides of your front seats during dog car travel? Prevent slobber stains with fabric waterproofing spray. Just make sure the spray is compatible with your seat fabric, or stray hairs will be the least of your worries!

 

7. A long-lasting treat

The more your pooch moves, the more mess they create. Even in the parallel universe where your pup is completely stationary during their journey, dog-owners’ cars are still covered in hair. But the less movement the better. Keep mind and mouth occupied with a long-lasting treat-dispensing toy. Something that involves food that is difficult to get to. Or a dog-friendly bone to chew on. Nom nom.

 

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Exploring new places with your furry friend is one of the best things about being a dog owner. And with a little planning, it needn’t destroy your car. On a more serious note, pay attention to the welfare of your dog during and shortly after dog car travel. Drooling, trembling or hunching could be a sign of travel sickness. It’s easy to prevent, so schedule an appointment with your vet.

To find more and to understand if your dog may be suffering from travel sickness see our infographic: 7 SIGNS YOUR DOG MAY BE SUFFERING FROM MOTION SICKNESS

 

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